Sustainability Micro reports

  • Embedding sustainability in the delivery of the Games Technology programme
    From processing spectators at the entrance gates or timing and scoring athletes, to supplying workers and volunteers with secure internet and radio networks, technology affected everyone at the London 2012 Games. Through its official technology providers, the London Organising Committee...
  • Sustainability reporting in a major event organisation
    The events sector is starting to take cautious steps in the reporting of its sustainability successes and failures. While the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Event Organisers Sector Supplement is a welcome development for the industry it came late in the...
  • Managing sustainability obligations within events infrastructure contracts
    The London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games (LOCOG) was responsible for procuring and managing the installation and decommissioning of ‘overlay commodities’ valued at more than £500 million, including more than 92,000 square metres of cabins, more...
  • Re-use and redeployment of Games technology assets
    All technology assets of the London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games (LOCOG) must be reused responsibly in order to leave a legacy from the Games, while other initiatives that will leave lasting benefits must be exploited....
  • McDonald’s: developing a zero waste strategy for the Games
    McDonald’s packaging and waste objective for the Games was to comply with or exceed the London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games (LOCOG’s) waste vision while minimising disruption to customers and operations on the Park, and at...
  • Materials and resource use in temporary venues
    London 2012 encouraged the building of temporary venues for many of its events in order to avoid the issue of venues for which there is no legacy use. This approach had the potential to reduce the environmental footprint of the...
  • London 2012 Inspire programme
    The London 2012 Inspire programme was a national programme established in 2008 to recognise outstanding non-commercial projects genuinely inspired by London 2012 Games. The Inspire mark acts as a promotional tool, enabling projects to connect with the Games and reach...
  • Development and application of the London 2012 Food Vision
    Some 15.5 million meals were served at the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games. All this was underpinned by the London 2012 Food Vision, published in December 2009. The Food Vision provided a strategic foundation for delivering a massive temporary...
  • The London 2012 education programme
    The London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games (LOCOG) developed a national and international programme which contributed to the sustainability agenda. Both of these programmes encouraged young people to explore community cohesion, cultural understanding, perceptions on disability...
  • Sustainable design of London 2012 Beach Volleyball courts
    The underlying concept of the installations at Horse Guards Parade and The Mall was based around maximising the use of hire components, minimising packaging and, where new materials were required, ensuring post-event value could be obtained from these materials through...
  • Games Maker uniforms
    As the Official Sportswear Partner of the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games, adidas supplied the Games Maker uniforms for 6,000 staff and up to 70,000 volunteers. This micro-report provides an overview of the sustainability approach taken to the supply...
  • Ensuring compliance with sustainability requirements during a major event
    The London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games (LOCOG) was the first Organising Committee to have had a Sustainability team in place from the outset. This micro-report provides an overview of how compliance with sustainability requirements was...
  • Delivery of sustainability at different venue types – strengths, challenges and opportunities
    Venues varied greatly in terms of location, building type, management processes, sports and environmental constraints. As a result, this required flexible approaches to implementing consistent sustainability targets and policies across all sites. This micro-report examines the strengths, challenges and opportunities...
  • Packaging and consumables for catering
    The London Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games (LOCOG) committed to send zero waste to landfill during the Games and aimed to reuse, recycle and compost 70 per cent of Games event operations waste. Modelling work commissioned by...
  • Assuring the sustainability of the 2012 Programme – a world first
    The London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games was the first summer Olympiad to be independently assured against its sustainability merits, providing independent, credible commentary and assurance over the sustainability of the London 2012 Programme through the use of a bespoke...
  • Project FSC certification – assuring legal and well managed timber
    As part of the Olympic Delivery Authority’s (ODA) sustainable timber objectives, the Athletes’ Village is on track to become the first project of its scale to achieve 100 per cent Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) sourced timber in the UK to...
  • Sustainable material use in paving and seating
    This report concentrates on the selection of hard paving materials for the concourse and the choice of timber for the seating. Lessons learned include the need to push for innovation in sustainable design, while respecting the constraints of budget and...
  • NoWaste Lean Construction training programme
    Raising awareness and improving skills in waste management through the NoWaste Lean Construction training programme on the Athletes’ Village directly resulted in a 13 per cent decrease in waste production over a six-month period and an estimated £94,000 saving in...
  • Treating Japanese Knotweed on the Olympic Park
    The site of the Olympic Park was neglected for many years and the resultant areas of waste ground and river corridors meant that these areas became extensively colonised by invasive weed species, including Japanese Knotweed. An invasive species strategy was...
  • Habitats for birds and bats on the Olympic Park
    As part of the biodiversity action plan (BAP), the Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) set a challenging target of placing 675 bat and bird boxes across the Olympic Park.
  • London 2012 Victory Ceremonies and sustainability
    Winning a medal at the Olympic or Paralympic Games is the ultimate honour for an athlete. The Victory Ceremony is the pinnacle of this experience, where athletes are presented with their medals and flowers on specifically designed podia. This micro-report...
  • Sustainability strategies adopted for delivering goods during the Games
    As the Official Logistics Provider to the London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games (LOCOG), UPS was responsible for the movement of some 30 million items ranging from boats to bean bags. Five strategies were adopted to...
  • Management and redeployment of Games assets for reuse
    Materials are a valuable resource that should not be wasted. Reuse contributes to waste prevention by removing items from the waste stream. It also contributes towards compensating an organisation’s carbon impacts. The London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and...
  • McDonald’s: embedding sustainability into the design, construction and disassembly of their Olympic Park restaurant
    The planning of McDonald’s Olympic Park restaurants was an exciting challenge for McDonald’s. It was a large-scale and complex construction project in itself and, in order to meet the London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games (LOCOG’s)...
  • Insulation from renewable sources and healthy to install
    Effective insulation is a fundamental component of any energy efficient and sustainable building. However, more often than not, little thought is given to the environmental impact of the actual insulation material being used. On the Olympic Park, several contractors sourced...
  • Implementation of the PVC policy
    In 2009, London 2012 published a policy on the use of Polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The policy set out parameters for using PVC on the London 2012 project including requirements to be considered in the manufacture and disposal of the material.
  • Assessing the sustainability of pavement design solutions
    As part of the Olympic Delivery Authority’s (ODA’s) commitment to sustainability, the London 2012 Parklands project aimed to ensure that the most sustainable option was achieved for the large areas of paving required. A tool was developed to objectively assess...
  • Responsible sourcing of the copper cladding on the Handball Arena
    This report describes the process and steps taken to ensure that the copper used on the Handball Arena was responsibly sourced with evidence of legal sourcing and environmental management systems, and through the use of chain of custody schemes.
  • Quiet Night-Time Deliveries – ‘Silent Approach’ – and London 2012
    Due to the implications of the competition schedule and the timings for athlete, spectator, press and broadcaster ingress and egress, it was always going to be necessary for official London 2012 venues to be serviced by deliveries at night time....
  • Sustainability in Press Operations
    The role of the Press Operations team at the London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games (LOCOG) was to ensure that the thousands of visiting journalists and photographers were able to get the information, interviews and pictures...
  • Combining photovoltaic panels and a living roof on the Main Press Centre
    The Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) installed a combined living roof and 84kWp array of photovoltaic panels (PVs) on the Main Press Centre (MPC) roof. The design and construction of the array was carried out in consultation with the roof designers...
  • Sustainable Carpet Tiles
    An estimated 39,000 metres squared (m2) of carpet was installed at the Media Centre. This is a significant area and was identified as a potential candidate to realise embodied carbon savings as carpet tiles have an embodied carbon (based on...
  • Permit to Proceed Assurance, protection of remediation works
    Extensive remediation was undertaken on the Olympic Park to create a viable site platform for the construction works. To protect these remediation works from follow-on projects, a Permit to Proceed (PTP) was implemented prior to any earthworks. Over 1,100 permits...
  • Transport of construction materials by sustainable means
    A key issue for major construction sites is the impact of vehicle deliveries on the local road network. The Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) made a commitment to minimise this impact by bringing in 50 per cent of construction materials by...
  • The control of noise during construction
    The Olympic Park is surrounded by residential properties, schools and businesses, so noise control was an important consideration during the construction. A Code of Construction Practice (CoCP) was a contractual requirement and included parameters for noise, dust and out-of-hours working.
  • Minimising potential nuisance dust from around a construction site
    To ensure the effective management of potential dust issues around the Olympic Park a network of continuous particulate monitors was established with a text alert system to highlight any potential nuisance so that mitigation could be activated.
  • Non-potable water supply for construction
    Construction sites have a significant demand for water to ensure adequate control of dust and mud on roads. It is preferable to use non-potable water supplies, as using the potable mains supply is more costly and less sustainable.
  • Eradicating invasive weeds during the construction of the Olympic Park
    The site of the Olympic Park was neglected for many years. The resultant areas of waste ground and river corridors meant that these areas became extensively colonised by invasive weed species such as giant hogweed, Himalayan balsam and floating pennywort....
  • Box Hill
    Natural England, the National Trust and LOCOG worked together to ensure that the biodiversity objectives for the Games were met for the cycling road races, especially at Box Hill. The result was a demonstration of how to make space for...
  • Games overlay waste and resources management
    ISG were one of the organisations appointed to provide construction management services to support the London Organising Committee of the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games (LOCOG) in the preparation, delivery and removal of ‘overlay’ (temporary facilities and infrastructure) for the...
  • Waste Recovery Licences
    During the Olympic Park enabling works, infrastructure and venue construction, over three million tonnes of soil and construction waste was treated and recovered or on-site use. This re-use of material was facilitated by the ODA formalising a waste Memorandum of...
  • The Olympic Park bridge abutments and retaining wall facings
    An innovative approach to the cladding of the concrete bridge abutments was taken on the Olympic Park. Use of recycled aggregate from the demolition was used to clad the bridge abutments to create a common visual identity between the bridges...
  • Rainwater harvesting at the Velodrome
    Rainwater harvesting was a key part of the Olympic Delivery Authority’s (ODA’s) objective to achieve up to a 40 per cent reduction in potable water across the programme. One-half of the Velodrome’s 13,000 metres squared roof was used for harvesting...
  • Manifold system for construction waste water discharges to sewer
    A common environmental incident on construction sites is the unauthorised discharge of effluent into the sewage system. In consultation with Thames Water an innovative approach to the control and management of discharges was developed using a manifold system that enabled...
  • Flood Risk Compliance Procedure
    The Olympic Park development is in the River Thames flood catchment. It was recognised that construction works within and adjacent to the waterways, could impact on cumulative flood risk. A procedure was adopted that required individual project teams to identify...
  • Reducing the Aquatics Centre’s water consumption
    The Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) had an Olympic Park-wide target to reduce drinking water consumption by 40 per cent (compared to 2006 industry standards). Due to the inherent nature of an aquatics centre, reducing this demand was particularly challenging.
  • Restoring the Olympic Park waterways
    The location and scale of the OIympic Park provided a unique opportunity to devise a waterways restoration strategy addressing water quality, flood-risk management, navigation, biodiversity and recreation.
  • Silt prevention for road surface water drainage
    Silt run-off is a common issue on construction sites, resulting in unauthorised silt discharge to waterways and associated costs of silt removal from drainage systems. The Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) approach on the Olympic Park was to prevent silt entering...
  • Lagoon system for waste water deposition and reuse for road sweeping
    The Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) set a target to minimise potable water use during the construction of the Olympic Park. The construction process also required the dewatering of excavations due to the shallow aquifer. The Logistics team constructed a lagoon...
  • Achieving the Part L target at the Aquatics Centre
    The Olympic Delivery Authority’s (ODA) target to exceed 2006 Part L Building Regulations by 15 per cent was not included in the Aquatics Centre’s original design brief, but was instructed at Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) Stage C. However...
  • The Velodrome, the most energy efficient venue on the Olympic Park
    The Olympic Development Authority (ODA) set all venues a target of exceeding Building Regulations (Part L 2006) by 15 per cent through energy efficient design. The Velodrome has significantly exceeded this, and has a designed energy efficiency improvement of 31...